adjacent


adjacent
adjacent, adjoining, contiguous, abutting, tangent, conterminous, juxtaposed mean being in close proximity.
Adjacent does not always imply actual contact but it does indicate that nothing of the same kind comes between; adjacent lots are in contact, but adjacent houses may or may not be
{

it is not likely that pure accident caused three adjacent windows to take a Spanish tontHenry Adams

}
Objects are adjoining when they meet and touch at some line or point of junction
{

adjoining estates

}
{

adjoining rooms

}
Contiguous adds to adjoining the implication of meeting and touching on one side or a considerable part of one side
{

streets lined with rows of contiguous houses

}
It may be used figuratively of events as well as of objects
{

adjacent events need not be contiguous-, just as there may be stretches of a string which are not occupied by beads, so the child may experience uneventful periods of time— Jeans

}
Abutting is usually applied to something that borders on or is in contact with something else, often with the implication of the termination of one thing by the other
{

land abutting on the road

}
{

the north wall, to which abutting rooms were added— Hussey

}
Tangent implies contact at a single point. Its literal use is chiefly geometrical
{

a line tangent to a curve

}
but in figurative and especially in absolute use it often stresses the general apartness rather than the single point of contact
{

his critics . . . went off at a tangentCarson

}
{

horror of the tangent, the extreme, the unconventional— Norman Douglas

}
{

that moment when a whistle’s final blow shall signal the deploy and we disperse alone, and tangent to the universe— Wolff

}
Objects are conterminous which border on each other or have a common boundary
{

defending the side of Germany conterminous to France— Lecky

}
Conterminous applies also to things having the same bounds, limits, or ends
{

the civil and the ecclesiastical parishes in England are sometimes, but not always, conterminous

}
Things are juxtaposed when they are placed side by side
{

disputes about water rights were almost inevitable between closely juxtaposed communities with expanding populations— Childe

}
especially so as to permit comparison or contrast
{

Juxtaposed ideas

}
{

opulence wildly juxtaposed to unbelievable poverty— Vanya Oakes

}
Analogous words: *nearest, next: successive, *consecutive: joining, connecting (see JOIN vb)
Antonyms: nonadjacent
Contrasted words: *distant, removed, remote: separated, parted (see SEPARATE vb)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • adjacent — adjacent, ente [ adʒasɑ̃, ɑ̃t ] adj. • 1314; lat. adjacens, de adjacere « être situé auprès » 1 ♦ Contigu, voisin. ⇒ attenant, proche. Terrain adjacent à un bois. « Qui sortant des maisons, qui des petites rues adjacentes » (Hugo). 2 ♦ (1751)… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Adjacent — Ad*ja cent, a. [L. adjacens, centis, p. pr. of adjacere to lie near; ad + jac[=e]re to lie: cf. F. adjacent.] Lying near, close, or contiguous; neighboring; bordering on; as, a field adjacent to the highway. The adjacent forest. B. Jonson. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adjacent — I adjective abutting, adjoining, alongside, beside, bordering, conterminous, contiguous, contiguus, continuous, convergent, finitimus, juxtaposed, meeting, neighboring, next to, proximal, touching, verging on, vicinal, vicinus associated concepts …   Law dictionary

  • Adjacent — is an adjective meaning contiguous , adjoining or abutting .In geometry, adjacent is when sides meet to make an angle.In trigonometry the adjacent side of a right angled triangle is the cathetus next to the angle in question.In graph theory… …   Wikipedia

  • adjacent — adjacent, adjoining An adjacent property is normally one that is nearby without necessarily touching the one being considered in relation to it. Similarly, adjacent angles in a triangle are separated by the length of one side of the triangle, an… …   Modern English usage

  • adjacent — [ə jā′sənt] adj. [L adjacens, prp. of adjacere, to lie near < ad , to + jacere, to lie, throw: see JET1] near or close (to something); adjoining adjacently adv. SYN. ADJACENT things may or may not be in actual contact with each other, but they …   English World dictionary

  • adjacent — ADJACENT, ENTE. adj. Qui est situé auprès, qui est aux environs. Pays adjacent. Lieux adjacens. Terres adjacentes. Iles adjacentes. Tout le Pays adjacent. Il ne se dit guère que De ce qui est étendu en surface …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • Adjacent — Ad*ja cent, n. That which is adjacent. [R.] Locke. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adjacent — adjacent, ente (a dja san, san t ) adj. 1°   Situé auprès. Lieux adjacents. Acquérir des terres adjacentes aux siennes. L Algérie est adjacente à ce qu on appelle le Désert. •   L élévation du sol de l Égypte s opère en même temps que cette… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Adjăcent — (v. lat.), anliegend, angrenzend …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.